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Blind Beast(Moju)

  • Dir: Masumura Yasuzo

  • Japan, 1969, Japanese, 86mins, DCP

  • Cast: Funakoshi Eiji, Midori Mako, Sengoku Noriko

Transforming the eerie horrific novel of Edogawa Ranpo into a visually inspiring tale of madness and perversion, Masumura forges headlong into the domain of surreal eroticism that prefigures Oshima Nagisa’s In the Realm of the Senses . Set in a Dali-esque artist’s studio covered in sculptured motifs of women’s body parts, a young model finds herself kidnapped and imprisoned as a muse for a blind sculptor who aspires to create his perfect art form. Failing to escape, she gradually succumbs to his uncanny vision and descends into sexual pleasure, as sadomasochistic desires drive the pair towards the ultimate ecstasy and depravity. With an edgy, nightmarish intensity, this outlandish gothic film remains one of the most powerful explorations of art, obsession and debasement.      

    Screening:

    In-theatre Screening

    Remarks

    1. Unless otherwise stated, all films (except English-speaking films) are subtitled in English.

    2. For screenings at ALL commercial cinemas, tickets are available at URBTIX till 5:00pm one day before respective screenings. After that, tickets will be available only at the box office of the screening venue on the day of screening, subject to availability.

    3. Screenings at HK Arts Centre, HK Film Archive and Tai Kwun: For screenings that are about to start in 1 hour, all remaining tickets can only be bought at the box offices of the respective screening venues.

    4. Screenings at HK Science Museum: There is no URBTIX Outlet at the venue. Tickets are available at URBTIX till 1 hour prior to the respective screenings. Door ticket counter opens 30 minutes before the screening. Limited tickets to non-sold out screenings will be available at the door, subject to availability (Cash Only).

    5. While it is the HKIFFS’s policy to secure the best possible print of the original version for all its screenings, the HKIFFS will appreciate its patrons’ understanding on occasions when less than perfect screening copies are screened.